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Dark Skinned Black Women & Girls Are More Than Shields & Race Warriors

June 9, 2020

After days of protesting and rioting across the country, social unrest lingers and emotions remain high from the murder of George Floyd. Two weeks ago, people of various race and creed, and corporations nationwide, joined in solidarity urging for racial equality.

For many black people, this gives us a feeling of hope, in a reoccurring state of despair. Passionate claims of a black love and revolution are flooding the black social media streets more than ever before. While this milestone of unification seems wonderful, my realist eyes can't help but see past the hype.

In a media that rarely promotes dark skinned girls and women for our beauty, we are suddenly being celebrated for being race warriors for the "revolution". In a community that dehumanizes black women, deeming us too masculine, strong and independent, that same perceived strength is now being praised and exalted by men who saw little value in it before.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seven year old dark skinned black girls are being adultified, thrown on the front lines (and going viral for it) while images of their mothers kneeling in front of armed law enforcement are spreading like wildfire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is not to say that black men/boys, non black women/girls or light skinned women/girls aren't protesting but it matters not if we are getting the most attention for it. It matters not when we will be targeted and sacrificed more as a result. Just as black people will be blamed for any looting from whites, the same applies here. 

I know this may not seem like a big deal to some, but the strong black woman archetype is damaging and the ramifications are life threatening, especially for dark skinned women and girls. For decades, this stereotype has and continues to rob black women of our femininity, negatively impacts our health, livelihood and our image as well. It's time for the dark skinned women who understand this to come together and change the narrative as best we can. Our lives depend on it. 

 

 

Remember ladies, being a strong woman isn't inherently a bad thing as strength is necessary at some point for all of us. However, there can always be too much of a good thing. Stop allowing the world and the black community to use you as shields and work horses all to hide you away when it's over. If we aren't good enough to be their love interests, we aren't good enough to be their labor. Dear Black Men: If you can't celebrate me in your success, then don't celebrate me in your struggle. Sincerely, a dark skinned woman that is not your mule. Pass this along to every black woman you know. 

  

 

 

 

 

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