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4 Things to Know About Skin Roller Systems & Hair Growth

October 28, 2019

So you have yet to hear about skin roller systems (aka microneedling) being used on your edges to assist hair growth? Piercing your scalp with hundreds of tiny needles to assist hair growth is the latest treatment that’s touted as allowing better absorption of products into the skin.

I recently watched a YouTube video where this young black woman was talking about using a skin roller system to regrow her edges. My initial thought was, what kind of tomfoolery is this using microneedling to promote hair growth? But, before drawing a conclusion I decided to investigate what this method really is and how it works.

1. What Is A Skin Roller System?

 

According to all the articles I read, it is a specialized tool used in microneedle therapy to stimulate collagen production. The tool is a hand-held instrument with hundreds of miniature needles that deliberately roll over the skin causing micro injury in the treated area.

 

This tool is used mainly by dermatologist on skin with enlarged pores, wrinkles, stretch marks and to treat acne. The microneedles are intended to penetrate the skin where collagen forms, to trigger collagen production.

2. Current Publicity Suggests Use to Assist Hair Growth

 

The idea behind using this tool is described in a popular blog post where the author states, “it creates tiny punctures in the scalp for topical oils to reach the hair follicles.” The author goes on to say, “think of it like aerating a lawn that causes nutrients, hydration and sunlight to reach the roots, making the grass grow healthier.” Finally, she says “this tool can improve scalp circulation and provide a healthy environment for hair growth.” 

3. Why This Method of Hair Growth Will Not Work

 

Topical solutions are designed to go on top of the head. They are not designed to go inside the scalp!

 

Also, there is a big difference between aerating a lawn and puncturing the scalp. Lawn aeration leaves the holes open. Scalp punctures (or any punctures to the skin) immediately close off to prevent unwanted or unwelcomed substances from entering the body. So unless these needles are injecting some type of solution to "grow healthier hair" as the above-mentioned author suggests, this method is of no benefit to the hair and scalp.

 

Contrary to the author's posts, using this apparatus is not healthy for hair growth.

 

Not only is this method dangerous but it can be associated with increased cancer risk when beauty products are internally absorbed into the bloodstream. Numerous companies claim their devices are FDA approved. Contrary to their statements, these devices have never been approved by the FDA. 1

4. Reasons Not To Us This Method

 

Skin roller systems are the latest suggested gimmicks appealing to consumers who want to promote hair growth. However, beware! This far from harmless looking device can lead to skin damage, scarring and infections.

 

1 https://myemail.constantcontact.com/Microneedling--FDA-Fact-or-Fiction-.html?soid=1114179097223&aid=giQkv0kaswE

 

Ultra Black Hair (UBH) is a black woman-owed hair care products company that has provided effective, high quality hair products for black women since 1989. It’s founder and CEO, Cathy Howse, created her hair care system to help black women promote the health and growth of their hair. For over thirty years, Howse has not only provided her customers with excellent products but has dedicated a significant amount of time and energy toward educating black women regarding the truths and myths about Afro-textured hair. Due to her work in this area, Howse has been recognized by Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who of American Women and Who’s Who in the World. To learn more about her product line, please visit her website at ultrablackhair.com 

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