Untitled.png

STOP Sharing Colorism Outrage Porn

August 1, 2017

We live in an era where social media is all the rage and "outrage porn" is at every scroll and mouse click. You know, the videos of deadly police shootings, brutal street fights and political controversy. Now, it's almost a guarantee that you will run into an article on your Twitter or Facebook feed that is specifically designed to rile you up and get your panties in a bunch.

Like a bee to honey, you take the click bait and the next thing you know, you're engaging in a keyboard war with some person you've never met who lives on the other side of the globe. Oh, and don't let a celebrity be involved because if the tea is hot enough, publications will race to win spilling it the fastest. In no time, your feed is saturated with various write-ups of one viral story. This is the land of outrage porn where news outlets have made millions on anger inciting articles across the world wide web.

The most recent related example of this is when colorist jackass, Gilbert Arenas attacked the looks and skin complexion of Lupita Nyong'o once again on Instagram. For the second time, publications spread the story like wildfire as if Arenas deserved to be mentioned ever again. As expected, it sent black women in another uproar and their Facebook/Twitter fingers and angry-face emoji's were flying galore. The same thing happened when Kodak Black doubled down on his colorist statements about dark skinned women; online news platforms doubled down with him.

Time and time again, we allow ourselves to get sucked up in colorism outrage porn and just like racism outrage porn, the propaganda can be very damaging to the black female psyche. We have to be honest with ourselves about this exploitative material and stop allowing news outlets to repeatedly capitalize from our pain. It's one thing to report a story once to get the word out but it's another to continuously allow a voice for colorist abusers and harassers. It's impossible for these publications to have the best interest at heart for dark skinned women and girls when they seemingly don't even consider the potential impact that this kind of material has on them.

It's time we stop giving into the urge to click, share and respond to triggering, anti-black woman articles and boycott the corporations who are responsible for creating them. Every share is money in their pocket and what do you get black women? More hurt feelings, more low self esteem and feelings of inferiority, that's what. Ask yourself, is it worth it?

 

Join DDS in not only boycotting the perpetrators of colorism but the online publications that would rather get a buck than to look out for dark skinned black women and girls. Remember, do NOT share, comment and UNSUBSCRIBE to any company who is guilty of this kind of exploitation. After all, who needs junk news anyway?

 

Free your mind and timeline of negative outrage porn and fill it with positivity instead. Our silence is power, black women.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Please reload

ubh4.JPG
IMG_8669.JPG

© 2019 DDS Magazine Inc. All Rights Reserved